Archive for January 14, 2021

I’ll Race Ya!   Leave a comment

Photo by Maria Orlova on Pexels.com

I’ve been reading Matthew 14 this morning and experiencing the story of Jesus walking on water. For me, today, this story is all about Peter walking on water.

First of all, what gave Peter the guts to even ask the question. Scared out of his wits like all of the other disciples, he heard Jesus’ voice. It sounds like a great deal of faith because he asked the ghost to do something he knew only Jesus could do, even though he hadn’t seen that trick before.

Then, he actually attempted to do what the ghost told him. Guts isn’t strong enough a description to describe what he displayed here. The man decided to leave the safety of the boat in a storm and see if he could stand on the water, let alone walk.

But he did, and walk he did too. Sure he lost sight of the moment and started to sink and needed Jesus to rescue him. I’m terribly positive that I would have done the same thing except I have doubts I would have worked up the courage to talk to a ghost then follow its command to get out and walk on the water. If I had made it that far it would have been an indication that the evening’s rum was delicious and plentiful.

All of this reminds me of the book and movie The Shack. There’s a scene where the main character and Jesus were walking around a pond and they get to the water to go back to the house. Jesus starts to walk across the water but the guy just looks at him like, yea right!

But Jesus gives him the ability (been a while since I’ve seen this so forgive forgotten details) to walk on the water so he tests it out and sure enough, there he is walking. So with a childlike eager look, he tilts his head toward the house and smiles. The next thing we see is these two racing across the water—a scene of incredible joy.

It was a stunning scene for me since it seems very much like something I can see myself doing. I’m sure the local fishermen would not appreciate the noise of the running, but I’d make a mad dash, laughing all the way.

It really feels like a look into heaven for me. No more horrible knees. No more pains of a sore back or stiff neck or arthritic hands. It’ll be like being a kid again with no worries—I’m taken care of. This is definitely the place I want to be, even if I admit to being completely clueless as to what it looks like from this side. All I know is that God is there while also being here. I can live with that!

So the next time I experience a storm in life, those pesky inevitable storms that come, I hope to remember this scene and this feeling. Maybe Jesus will give me the opportunity. It will bring me overwhelming joy to point to the opposite shore, give him that look, and say to him, “I’ll race ya!”

Posted January 14, 2021 by David N. Peppler, Sr. in Uncategorized

Gyon   Leave a comment

I have no idea if I have spelled it correctly. I also have little faith that it is an actual word. All I know is that I have heard it a lot over the years, and to this day I am unsure what it means. Language and dialect tend to do these things to us. They separate us and cause us to look at each other differently, sometimes cocking our heads and wondering what on earth the other person is trying to communicate with us.

For example, my Aunt Joan was notorious for using this word, “gyon.” She pronounced it (as I have heard others) much like it is spelled (or at least my attempt at it): a hard “g” followed by “yahn.” She used it much where I would use the word “darned.” If I wanted to know where something was and she was unaware, she would reply, “Gyon if I know.”

I remember countless times asking her what that word meant. Mind you, I would often get the same statement in response, “Gyon if I know.” This is not helpful. I can imagine the day of Pentecost where all of the disciples were speaking languages unknown to them. The people were justifiably amazed at this. There were rumblings among the people, some saying the disciples were drunk. My imagination does not have to work hard to visualize my aunt as one of the disciples that day. I can easily see someone coming up to her and asking how she is speaking in their language. I can even hear her voice as she would utter her response, “Gyon if I know.”

Bless her heart.

What was true when I was growing up is still an issue in some churches today. There is a language barrier between those who have been in church all of their lives and those who are just beginning to explore what church is all about. Church folks will use church words and the explorers just scratch their heads and wonder what language they are hearing or question if they’re still in the same galaxy when they walked through the front door that looks strangely like some portal. They came in, sat on our hard benches, and noticed how some folks appeared to not get “bleacher butt” like they did because the “from here” folk were used to the discomfort. Then someone spoke from a podium with thees and thous and confused the heck out of their children.

I suppose that I will never understand how and why some of God’s really good folks insist on speaking a language that other folks–especially those seeking something incredibly important–will never understand. But if anyone ever asks me why I think this is still the case in some circles, I know what my response will be.

Gyon if I know!